Are You the Creator’s Original Blessing?

Posted On September 11, 2016

A lot of us suffer from low self-esteem.  We fight with our self, trying to determine whether we’re a “good witch” or a “bad witch.” And our answer varies from day-to-day, sometimes moment-by-moment.

            Maybe part of the problem with our self-esteem rises out of an ancient debate that continues to fester to this day in Christianity: are we sinners marred by original sin? Or are we the original blessing of God gifted with his loving presence?

            The original sin vs. original blessing debate dates back centuries ago to a time when the early fathers were establishing initial church doctrine.

            One school of thought, the original sin guys, contended we’re all sinners as a result of Adam and Eve’s disobedience.  Jesus came, they theorized, to re-open the gates of heaven and provide retribution for our sin. 

            The other school of thought, the original blessing guys, argued that we’re formed out of God’s love and delight. God’s plan for all creation is that we continue to be a conduit for God’s love to expand into the world. Jesus came, they believed, to show us how to live a perfect life of unconditional love so we can model our lives after him.

            Franciscan priest Richard Rohr writes that the original sin contenders won the debate. So, the doctrine of original sin has prevailed as church doctrine.       

            However, according to Rohr, the Franciscans continued to believe back then, and still do today, that the original blessing theory is God’s true picture of humanity.  Says Rohr, if we start with a negative (we’re sinners in need of redemption), we’ll end with a negative. But, if we start with a positive (we are God’s beloved sons and daughters embraced by his love), we’ll end with a positive.

            To be honest, the original blessing theory makes better sense to me. When I look into the mirror and say out loud, “I Am God’s Original Blessing,” I’m invited to affirm my dignity as a human being created out of God’s abundant love. And as a result of God’s gift of unconditional love and blessing to and for me, I’m reminded I have a responsibility to use the gift of my life to allow God to pour more love into the world. That’s both a blessing and a responsibility tied up in one human package.

            I suppose the debate will continue for generations to come because human beings can’t really put words and theories into God’s mouth and mind. And in the end, perhaps it doesn’t matter what theory is correct.  What really matters is, are we aware of the amazing gift of life we’ve been granted by God? And do we respond with gratitude to the Creator’s abundant gift of love by striving to live a life that’s a conduit for God to pour more unconditional love into the world?

brian j plachta
www.brianplachta.net

​ 
            A lot of us suffer from low self-esteem.  We fight with our self, trying to determine whether we’re a “good witch” or a “bad witch.” And our answer varies from day-to-day, sometimes moment-by-moment.

            Maybe part of the problem with our self-esteem rises out of an ancient debate that continues to fester to this day in Christianity: are we sinners marred by original sin? Or are we the original blessing of God gifted with his loving presence?

            The original sin vs. original blessing debate dates back centuries ago to a time when the early fathers were establishing initial church doctrine.

            One school of thought, the original sin guys, contended we’re all sinners as a result of Adam and Eve’s disobedience.  Jesus came, they theorized, to re-open the gates and heaven and provide retribution for our sin. 

            The other school of thought, the original blessing guys, argued that we’re formed out of God’s love and delight. God’s plan for all creation is that we continue to be a conduit for God’s love to expand into the world. Jesus came, they believed, to show us how to live a perfect life of unconditional love so we can model our lives after him.

            Franciscan priest Richard Rohr writes that the original sin contenders won the debate. So, the doctrine of original sin has prevailed as church doctrine.       

            However, according to Rohr, the Franciscans continued to believe back then, and still do today, that the original blessing theory is God’s true picture of humanity.  Says Rohr, if we start with a negative (we’re sinners in need of redemption), we’ll end with a negative. But, if we start with a positive (we are God’s beloved sons and daughters embraced by his love), we’ll end with a positive.

            To be honest, the original blessing theory makes better sense to me. When I look into the mirror and say out loud, “I Am God’s Original Blessing,” I’m invited to affirm my dignity as a human being created out of God’s abundant love. And as a result of God’s gift of unconditional love and blessing to and for me, I’m reminded I have a responsibility to use the gift of my life to allow God to pour more love into the world. That’s both a blessing and a responsibility tied up in one human package.

            I suppose the debate will continue for generations to come because human beings can’t really put words and theories into God’s mouth and mind. And in the end, perhaps it doesn’t matter what theory is correct.  What really matters is, are we aware of the amazing gift of life we’ve been granted by God? And do we respond with gratitude to the Creator’s abundant gift of love by striving to live a life that’s a conduit for God to pour more unconditional love into the world?

brian j plachta
www.brianplachta.net

Written by Brian J. Plachta

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